Lube Report EMEA

November 17, 2017 by  
Filed under How To Car Videos

Emailed to subscribers, every issue features focused editorial content specific to the region, the relevant regional base oil price report and breaking news. Topics covered are: finished lubricants, base oils, additives and packaging, along with trends in automotive, manufacturing and other key industries.

Independent and informed regional reporting helps industry professionals keep up with events and know what to make of them.

Request Free!

Free Automotive Magazines and Downloads from gordenwebdesign-biz.tradepub.com

Tesla Reports Positive Quarterly Profit Report

July 23, 2017 by  
Filed under How To Fix Your Car

Tesla Motors has released its latest quarterly profit report.
The electric car company, led by Elon Musk, posted a net income of almost million, or 14-cents per share, for the third quarter report.
The financial term, which ended on Sept. 30th, is a noticeable turn-around compared to a year ago when the company reported a loss of nearly 0 million.
The total revenue of the company more than doubled as well, reaching .3 billion.
Their adjusted profits for the quarter came in at 71-cents per share.
The boost to the revenue was helped by record deliveries that offset rising expenses related to next year’s upcoming Model 3 sedan.
http://feeds.reuters.com/~r/reuters/topNews/~3/8wp37Rgjhns/us-tesla-results-idUSKCN12Q2QW

Home

This video was produced by YT Wochit Business using http://wochit.com

Orion Spacecraft & Space Launch System: “Exploration Systems Division Quarterly Report” Q1 2013 NASA

June 7, 2016 by  
Filed under How To Fix Your Car

more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/astro/orion_cev_news_and_links.html

Covers 1st quarter 2013 development of the Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle and support facilities and Space Launch System, including spacecraft manufacturing technologies, changes to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Crawler Transporters, parachute and splashdown recovery tests, etc.

Public domain film from NASA.

http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/mpcv/index.html

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion_(spacecraft)

Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is a planned beyond-low-earth-orbit manned spacecraft that is being built by Lockheed Martin for NASA and Astrium for European Space Agency for crewed missions to the Moon, asteroids and Mars. It is planned to be launched by the Space Launch System. Each Orion spacecraft is projected to carry a crew of four or more astronauts. It is also planned as a backup for ISS cargo and/or crew delivery,

The MPCV was announced by NASA on 24 May 2011, aided by designs and tests already completed for a spacecraft of the cancelled Constellation program, development for which began in 2005 as the Crew Exploration Vehicle. It was formerly going to be launched by the tested-but-cancelled Ares I launch vehicle.

The MPCV’s debut unmanned multi-hour test flight, known as Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT-1), is scheduled for a launch aboard a Delta IV Heavy rocket in 2014. The first manned mission is expected to take place after 2020. In January 2013, ESA and NASA announced that the Orion Service Module will be built by European space company Astrium for European Space Agency…

http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/740425main_OrionMAR-March2013.pdf

Orion Monthly Accomplishments, March 2013

NASA’s Super Guppy moves world’s largest heat shield from Denver to Boston

The Super Guppy landed in Boston on March 27 after its cross-country flight from Lockheed Martin’s Waterton Facility near Denver to deliver the world’s largest heat shield to Textron Defense Systems in Wilmington, Mass… The Avcoat thermal ablation material will be applied to the heat shield over the next few months.

The heat shield is designed to protect the spacecraft and crew from the extreme temperatures during a high-speed, deep space re-entry and the impact of splashdown. After Textron completes the application processing, the shield will be shipped to Cape Canaveral, Fla., where it will be attached to the bottom of the Orion crew module for its first orbital flight test in 2014.

Ogive panel assembly in progress at Michoud

Members of the Orion Launch Abort System (LAS) team met at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans to review progress of the incorporation of the LAS ogive assembly, which will be flown on the Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) Mission, launching in 2014. Precision integration of the ogive assembly, which plays a part in protecting the crew module and providing protection during its journey through the atmosphere, is performed using the ogive integration tool.
The ogive panels were placed on the assembly tool and drilling on the panels is in progress.

Shear web assembly installed in EFT-1 service module

The EFT-1 Service Module shear web assembly and forward bulkhead was installed into the service module structure at the Kennedy Space Center’s Operations and Checkout building. Laser alignment of the shear panels is complete and drilling of the panels and longerons are in work. Installation of secondary structures helps prepare crew module for static loads test.

The EFT-1 Crew Module was relocated from the birdcage tool onto the dolly at the Operations and Checkout building where backshell drill templates were installed to perform match drilling of the attachment assembly. Strain gauge installations and secondary structure installations continue on the vehicle in preparation for the static loads test. In addition, the custom replacement brackets and the aft
bulkhead doublers have been installed on the crew module to repair the aft bulkhead rib cracking that occurred during proof pressure testing.

The second series of EFT-1 Crew Module/Service Module retention and release shock tests were completed with the separation bolts performing nominally. This series of tests was used as a qualification test for Environmental Control and Life
Support System hardware, as well as the retention and release separation spring assemblies…
Video Rating: / 5

more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/astro/orion_cev_news_and_links.html

Covers 4th quarter 2012 development of the Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle and support facilities and Space Launch System, including spacecraft manufacturing technologies, changes to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Crawler Transporters, parachute and splashdown recovery tests, etc.

Public domain film from NASA.

Orion & SLS playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL57B48E4271D610C8

http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/mpcv/index.html

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion_(spacecraft)

Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is a planned, beyond-low Earth orbit (LEO) manned spacecraft that is being built by Lockheed Martin for NASA, and Airbus Defence and Space for the European Space Agency for crewed missions to the Moon, asteroids and Mars. It is planned to be launched by the Space Launch System. Each Orion spacecraft is projected to carry a crew of 0–6 astronauts.

The MPCV was announced by NASA on May 24, 2011, aided by designs and tests already completed for a spacecraft of the cancelled Constellation program, development for which began in 2005 as the Crew Exploration Vehicle. It was formerly going to be launched by the tested-but-cancelled Ares I launch vehicle.

The MPCV’s debut unmanned multi-hour test flight, known as Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT-1), is scheduled for a launch aboard a Delta IV Heavy rocket in December 2014 The first crewed mission is expected to take place after 2020. In January 2013, ESA and NASA announced that the Orion Service Module will be built by European space company Airbus Defence and Space for the European Space Agency….

The Orion Crew and Service Module (CSM) stack consists of two main parts: a conical Crew Module (CM), and a cylindrical Service Module (SM) holding the spacecraft’s propulsion system and expendable supplies. Both are based substantially on the Apollo Command and Service Modules (Apollo CSM) flown between 1967 and 1975, but include advances derived from the space shuttle program. “Going with known technology and known solutions lowers the risk,” according to Neil Woodward, director of the integration office in the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate.

The MPCV resembles its Apollo-era predecessors, but its technology and capability are more advanced. It is designed to support long-duration deep space missions of up to 21 days maximum active crew time plus 6 months quiescent. During the quiescent period crew life support would be provided by another module such as a Deep Space Habitat. The spacecraft’s life support, propulsion, thermal protection and avionics systems are designed to be upgradeable as new technologies become available.

The MPCV spacecraft includes both crew and service modules, and a spacecraft adaptor.

The MPCV’s crew module is larger than Apollo’s and can support more crew members for short or long-duration spaceflight missions. The service module fuels and propels the spacecraft as well as storing oxygen and water for astronauts. The service module’s structure is also being designed to provide locations to mount scientific experiments and cargo…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_Launch_System

The Space Launch System (SLS) is a United States Space Shuttle-derived heavy launch vehicle being designed by NASA. It follows the cancellation of the Constellation Program, and is to replace the retired Space Shuttle. The NASA Authorization Act of 2010 envisions the transformation of the Constellation program’s Ares I and Ares V vehicle designs into a single launch vehicle usable for both crew and cargo.

The SLS launch vehicle is to be upgraded over time with more powerful versions. Its initial Block I version is to lift a payload of 70 metric tons to low Earth orbit (LEO), while Block IB with the Exploration Upper Stage will lift approximately 93. Block II will replace the initial Shuttle-derived boosters with advanced boosters and is planned to have a LEO capability of up to 155 metric tons, fulfilling the congressional requirement of at least 130 metric tons; this would make the SLS the most capable heavy lift vehicle ever built.

These upgrades will allow the SLS to lift astronauts and hardware to various beyond-LEO destinations: on a circumlunar trajectory as part of Exploration Mission 1 with Block I, to a near-Earth asteroid in Exploration Mission 2 with Block IB, and to Mars with Block II. The SLS will launch the Orion Crew and Service Module and may support trips to the International Space Station if necessary. SLS will use the ground operations and launch facilities at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Florida…
Video Rating: / 5

Lube Report Asia

March 19, 2016 by  
Filed under How To Car Videos

Emailed to subscribers, each issue reports on finished lubricants, base oils, additives and packaging, along with trends in automotive, manufacturing and other key industries. Independent and informed regional reporting helps industry professionals keep up with events and know what to make of them.

Request Free!

Free Automotive Magazines and Downloads from gordenwebdesign-biz.tradepub.com

Project Mercury First Quarterly Report Oct-Dec 1959 NASA

December 16, 2015 by  
Filed under How To Fix Your Car

Project Mercury First Quarterly Report Oct-Dec 1959 NASA

more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/astro/nasa_news.html

Project Mercury 1st Congressional report focuses on Mercury spacecraft development and production.

Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved sound and video, and all in one piece instead of parts.

Public domain film from NASA, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and 1-pass exposure & color correction applied (cannot be ideal in all scenes).
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

PROJECT MERCURY PLAYLIST:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Mercury

Project Mercury was the first human spaceflight program of the United States. It ran from 1959 through 1963 with two goals: putting a human in orbit around the Earth, and doing it before the Soviet Union, as part of the early space race. It succeeded in the first but not the second: in the first Mercury mission on 5 May 1961, Alan Shepard became the first American in space; however the Soviet Union had put Yuri Gagarin into space one month earlier. John Glenn became the first American (third overall, following Gagarin and Titov) to reach orbit on February 20, 1962, during the third manned Mercury flight.

The program included 20 unmanned launches, followed by two suborbital and four orbital flights with astronaut pilots. Early planning and research were carried out by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), but the program was officially conducted by its successor organization, NASA. It also absorbed the USAF program Man In Space Soonest which had had the same objectives. Mercury laid the groundwork for Project Gemini and the follow-on Apollo moon-landing program…

Spacecraft

Design

Because of their small size, it was said that the Mercury spacecraft were worn, not ridden. With 60 cubic feet (1.7 m3) of habitable volume,[citation needed] the spacecraft was just large enough for the single crew member. Inside were 120 controls: 55 electrical switches, 30 fuses and 35 mechanical levers. The spacecraft was designed by Max Faget and NASA’s Space Task Group.

Despite the astronauts’ test pilot experience NASA at first envisioned them as “minor participants” during their flights, causing many conflicts between the astronauts and engineers during the spacecraft’s design. Nonetheless, contrary to other reports, the project’s leaders always intended for pilots to be able to control their spacecraft, as they valued humans’ ability to contribute to missions’ success. John Glenn’s manual attitude adjustments during the first orbital flight were an example of the value of such control. The astronauts requested—and received—a larger window and manual reentry controls.

Production summary

NASA ordered 20 production spacecraft, numbered 1 through 20, from McDonnell Aircraft Company, St. Louis, Missouri. Five of the 20, Nos. 10, 12, 15, 17, and 19, were not flown. Spacecraft No. 3 and No. 4 were destroyed during unmanned test flights. Spacecraft No. 11 sank and was recovered from the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean after 38 years. Some spacecraft were modified after initial production (refurbished after launch abort, modified for longer missions, etc.) and received a letter designation after their number, examples 2B, 15B. Some spacecraft were modified twice; for example, spacecraft 15 became 15A and then 15B.

A number of Mercury boilerplate spacecraft (including mockup/prototype/replica spacecraft, made from non-flight materials or lacking production spacecraft systems and/or hardware) were also made by NASA and McDonnell Aircraft. They were designed and used to test spacecraft recovery systems, and escape tower and rocket motors. Formal tests were done on test pad at Langley and at Wallops Island using the Little Joe and Big Joe rockets…
Video Rating: / 5

Next Page »